The full program schedule

Here is the full schedule for GIJC-2008!

Wednesday September 10th

09.00-23.00: Registration. Hotel lobby.
19.00: Welcome reception with “A Taste of Norway”. Buffet and wine, and an introduction to Norwegian food traditions at the restaurant of Radisson SAS Lillehammer by gastronomic expert Lauritz Hansen. (Sponsored by Innovation Norway).
21:00: Screening: "If You Are Watching This, Mum". Bosnia (2008).
A group of children from an orphanage in Sarajevo were taken to Italy during the siege of the city from 1992 to 1995. Most of them never returned. In Bosnia rumors circulated about the children being forced into prostitution or sold for adoption. In cooperation with investigative journalists in Italy, two Bosnian filmmakers started to research the fate of the children.
Dario Novalic and Mustafa Mustafic, Bosnia. (In cooperation with SCOOP-Denmark).
Venue: Weidemann 5+4. 

Thursday September 11th

09.00-23.00: Registration. Hotel lobby.
09:00: Official opening with GIJC-2008 chairman, Jan Gunnar Furuly, (SKUP/Aftenposten).

09:10: What happened to journalism after 9/11

The status of journalism post-9/11 in different countries. What new limits and problems are journalists facing with government control?
David Banisar, (Privacy International), UK, David B. Smallman, (Wollmuth Maher & Deutsch LLP), USA,  Andrei Soldatov, (Novaya Gazeta/Agentura.ru), Russia, Chuck Lewis, (American University School of Communication ), USA and Matti Stenrosen, (Kristianstadsbladet), Sweden. Moderator: Brigitte Alfter, (freelance), Denmark.
Venue: Weidemann 3+4+5:
10.30: Break.

11.00: War on terror = War on Truth?

The relationship between Al-Qaeda and Western intelligence services after the Cold War.
Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed (Institute for Policy Research and Development), UK. Moderator: Marina Tofting, (NRK), Norway
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
11:00: How to present your investigation on radio
How do you present your investigative journalism project on radio: bulletin news, 3-5 min clips and longer documentaries. Learn from two award-winning reporters.
Susanne Reber and Sandra Bartlett, (CBC), Canada. Moderator: Marianne Ruud, (Utdanning), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
11:00: How to keep track of your numbers
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter David Kay Johnston, often referred to as the "de facto chief tax enforcement officer of the United States”, explains how to give meaning to numbers, and how to turn numbers into understandable figures so people can grasp relationships.
 
David Cay Johnston, ex-New York Times, USA. Moderator: Bent Botten, (Tidens Krav), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
11:00: How private security spy on NGOs and journalists
How private security companies are spying on NGOs and journalists. Who are the groups which have been targeted by big multinationals? What kind of methods do they use?
Jean-Philippe Ceppi, (Temps Présents, Swiss Broadcasting Corporation), Switzerland. Moderator: Josephine Freje Simonsson, (SVT), Sweden.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
11:00: Repercussions of a Liberian sex scandal
A Liberian newspaper publisher narrowly avoided several attempts to lure him into an ambush in early 2008. The publisher received death threats in February 2007 for publishing a story and photos of a senior aide to the president having sex with two women. The publisher was arrested, the police denied any knowledge of his whereabouts, and the government withdrew his paper's license. Several people were arrested in February 2008, including one carrying a government ID.
Sam O. Dean, (The Independent Newspaper), Liberia. Moderator: Heidi Molstad Andresen, (Dagbladet), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
11:00: The wonderful world of Computer-Assisted Reporting: An introduction to the latest CAR-scoops and the classes offered at GIJC
A presentation of outstanding computer-assisted reporting from the last year throughout the world, and a short introduction to what you can learn at the many CAR-workshops at the conference. Get more journalistic muscles to solve small and big projects.
Helena Bengtsson, (SVT), Sweden,  Jennifer LaFleur, (ProPublica), USA and Tommy Kaas, (Kaas & Mulvad), Denmark. Moderator: Trond Sundnes, Dagens Næringsliv, Norway.
Venue: Meeting room B.
12:00: Lunch

13.30: How to protect your sources I/The Sonera-scandal

A team from Finland’s largest newspaper started an investigation into one of the country’s largest mobile phone operators. Soon they found themselves under surveillance. The company tapped the reporters’ phones. Panel focuses on how you need to protect your sources in the digital world.
Tuomo Pietiläinen, (Helsingin Sanomat) Finland and Frode Nielsen, (Norwegian Broadcasting Corp – NRK), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
13.30: Covering Afghanistan from the inside
Does investigative journalism exist as far as Afghan media is concerned?  Do the local and national media in Afghanistan practice freedom of speech? Two reporters look at role of the media and the challenges they face in Afghanistan. How dangerous is it to not report the SMS messages from Taleban?
Massoud Qiam, (Tolo TV), Afghanistan and Harun Najafizada, BBC Persian Services, Afghanistan. Moderator: Sigurd Falkenberg Mikkelsen, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 3.

13.30: Putin’s world: Investigative reporting in Russia

What are the possibilities of doing critical, investigative reporting in today's Russia? Russian journalists from various regions share their experiences.

Roman Shleynov, (Novaya Gazeta, Moscow), Russia, Evgeny Titov, (Novaya Gazeta, Krasnodar), Jelena Larionova, (BarentsPress, Murmansk), Russia, Jevgenij Kirillov, (Kola Sami Radio, Lovozero), Russia and Maria Eismont (Eurasia.org), Russia.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
13.30: Tell how people lie: Learn to read the body language of your sources
How can you tell someone is lying?  If you could, it would probably help you do a better job interviewing people.  Drew Sullivan and Geoff Kay will take you through the latest studies and techniques and show you what is helpful. The panel will look at police techniques, statement analysis and the latest theories in this field of psychology. You will learn tools that will help you identify areas when someone might not be telling you the truth.
Drew Sullivan, (Center for Investigative Reporting), Bosnia and Geoff Kay, Argent Associates, UK. Moderator: Rolf J. Widerøe, (Verdens Gang), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
13.30: Lost in transition? From authoritarian to democratic rule
Focus on transparency, sources for information, working conditions and independence of the press in the Baltic and Balkans.
Tarmo Vahter, (Eesti Ekspress), Estonia, Stanimir Vaglenov, (24 Hours), Bulgaria, Meri Jordanovska, (Nova Makedonija), Macedonia and Paul Radu (Romanian Center for Investigative Journalism). Moderator: Per Anders Johansen, (Aftenposten), Norway. 
Venue: Inga.
13.30: Online Bloodhound
 
The Online Bloodhound is a special course developed by journalists at the Norwegian Institute of Journalism on online research skills. The seminar teaches you about how the search engines ‘think’ and how to find information beyond Google. A 3-hour seminar has been developed for this conference, but close to 2000 Norwegian journalists have taken this seminar which normally lasts for two days. (Double session with continuation after the break!).
Andre Verløy, (Norwegian Institute of Journalism), Norway and Ståle de Lange Kofoed, (Norwegian Institute for Journalism), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
13.30: Excel I: Creating your first spreadsheet, calculate and sort your data.
Helena Bengtsson (Swedish Television), Sweden and Trond Sundnes (Dagens Næringsliv), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
13.30: File and find: Automated Research Managers (ARMs)
File and find is the motto of this workshop. Learn how to store (and backup!) Web searches, phone calls, documents, sources, questions and notes in a simple but effective database. There are many software programs (most of them free!) that can help journalists to organize their research.
Luuk Sengers, (freelance), The Netherlands.
Venue: Meeting room B.
14.30: Break
15:00: How to protect your sources II: How easy it is to tap your cell phone
Norway's Security Authority with a LIVE demonstration on how easy it is to tap and take control over a cell phone with software sold on the Internet.
Stig Ove Olsen, (senior engineer), Norway's Security Authority, Norway. Moderator: Frode Nielsen, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
15:00: Exposing political parties and their strategies
Professional strategists, spin doctors, pollsters, campaign consultants (and lots of money) are at the center of modern politics. This session looks at how to recognize and expose modern techniques of political and media manipulation. Nicky Hager’s investigation into New Zealand’s main conservative party is the case study.
Nicky Hager (freelance), New Zealand. Moderator: Bent Botten, (Tidens Krav), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
15:00: The end of news?
 
Lowell Bergman looks at 40 years history of investigative reporting and the current crisis in the production of in-depth reporting.
 
Lowell Bergman, (PBS Frontline), USA
 
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
15:00: The Pearl Project: The hunt for those who killed Wall Street Journal journalist Daniel Pearl.
Wall Street journalist Daniel Pearl was kidnapped and killed in Karachi in 2002. Asra Q. Nomani formed the Pearl Project with one goal in mind: To find the people who killed him. How is the team working and what are the practical and ethical challenges. 
Asra Q. Nomani, (Ex. Wall Street Journal/Georgtown University), USA/India and Massoud Ansari, (freelance), Pakistan. Moderator: Bill Buzenberg, (Center for Public Integrity), USA.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
15:00: Following Gazprom in Europe/Uncovering the sex-trafficking ring
Part one: Journalists Stefan Candea and Paul Radu from Romania have been investigating operations by Gazprom in Europe the last year. They tell how they organized this story, technical steps, sharing info, meetings, difficulties, solutions, presenting the main story and sidebars. Part two: Working undercover for eight months, Anas was responsible for breaking two major trafficking rings in Accra. He exposed methods of transportation and the identities of immigration officials who were accepting bribes in return for overlooking fake visas and passports.
Stefan Candea, (Romanian Centre for Investigative Journalism), Romania and Paul Radu ( Romanian Centre for Investigative Journalism)/ Anas Aremeyaw Anas, (Crusading Guide), Ghana. Moderator: Heidi Molstad Andresen, (Dagbladet), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
15:00: Online Bloodhound – continued from 13:30
The Online Bloodhound is a special course developed by journalists at the Norwegian Institute of Journalism on online research skills. The seminar teaches you about how the search engines ‘think’ and how to find information beyond Google. A 3-hour seminar has been developed for this conference, but close to 2000 Norwegian journalists have taken this seminar which normally lasts for two days.
Andre Verløy, (Norwegian Institute of Journalism), Norway and Ståle de Lange Kofoed, (Norwegian Institute for Journalism), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
15:00: Excel II: Downloading data into Excel, using simple formulas to format and
analyze you material.
Helena Bengtsson (Swedish Television), Sweden and Trond Sundnes (Dagens Næringsliv), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
15:00: DEMO - Retriever/Lexis Nexis
Learn how to use Lexis Nexis. Demo room available with full user access to all Lexis Nexis databases.
Venue: Meeting room B.
16:00: Break.
16:30: The ABC of investigative journalism
Nils Hansson of SVT's investigative unit gives you a 10 step guide to investigative journalism - from idea to publishing. This presentation has been well received by a large number of Scandinavian reporters in recent years.
Nils Hansson, (Swedish Television), Sweden. Moderator: Ståle Hansen (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
16:30: The famine scam
Is it acceptable to exaggerate and embellish the truth if it serves a good purpose? When the UN and the BBC sounded the alarm in Niger 2005, the story around the world was that millions were dying of famine, and pictures of severely malnourished children were shown. But a documentary team from TV 2 Norway found a completely different story when going back to Niger. The film, nominated for the prestigious Golden Nymph Award, is now being stopped from further distribution by the BBC claiming that TV 2 cannot use their copyrighted footage from Niger in a way that harms the good reputation of BBC.
Mats Ektvedt (journalist), TV 2, Norway and Per Christian Magnus, (journalist), TV 2.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
16:30: Indigenous rights vs. the mining industry: Mining on tribal land in Orissa, India
The film Mahua Memoirs explores some of the poorest and most deprived tribal communities in India as they are facing large-scale industrialization and some of the country’s largest and most  powerful business groups. The panel also focuses on other mineral and resource battles elsewhere on the planet, between global industrial giants and indigenous people.
Vinod Raja, (film maker/Grassroot Media), India and Jodi Rave, Lee Enterprises, USA. Moderator: Liv Inger Somby (Resource Centre for the Rights of Indigenous Peoples), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
16:30: Investigating conspiracy theories
Most established media just turn their backs at the conspiracy ideas after 9/11. Norwegian regional newspaper Stavanger Aftenblad and Le Monde Diplomatique Norway decided to start investigating them.
What did they find?
Kristin Aalen, (Stavanger Aftenblad), Norway and Kim Bredesen (Le Monde diplomatique), Norway . Moderator: Peter Svaar, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
16:30: Tobacco Roads/Smoking out Big Tobacco’s insiders
Almost 10 percent of all cigarettes in Europe are illegal. Tobacco smuggling and fake cigarettes is a global multi-billion Euro industry. Two reporters will show you how the industry works, what to look for in your country and how to report on this criminal enterprise. They will use examples from their eight country project that traced illegal tobacco shipments through the traditional smuggling routes of the Balkans. 
Drew Sullivan, (Center for Investigative Reporting), Bosnia, Paul Radu (Romanian Center for Investigative Journalism), Romania and Bill Birnbauer (The Age), Australia. Moderator: Bo Brekke, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
16:30: Making your own databases automatically updated
By Web scraping you can make tools for monitoring Web sites minute to minute. You can follow members of parliament and how they vote and talk and publish it on your own Web site. And you can download all new data on houses and share them with other journalists through a Web server.
Espen Andersen, (Norwegian Broadcastin Corp - NRK), Norway and Nils Mulvad (Kaas & Mulvad), Denmark.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
16:30: Web query
How to make your own Web based surveys.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
John Bones, (Verdens Gang), Norway.
16:30: Reporter spycraft: How to keep your secrets.
What are the computer and communication safety dangers that threaten you? How can you protect yourself?
Steve Doig, (Arizona State University), USA.
Venue: Meeting room B.
17:30: Break
18.30: Dinner

20:00: Six years in Guantanamo: The silence of the media.

Meet Al-Jazeera cameraman Sami al-Hajj. The cameraman was seized by Pakistani intelligence near the Afghan border in December 2001. Despite holding a legitimate visa to work for Al Jazeera’s Arabic channel in Afghanistan, he was handed over to the U.S. military in January 2002 and sent to Guantanamo.   He was held as an “enemy combatant” without ever facing a trial or charges. He was released on May 2, 2008. During the long time in Guantanamo most of the Western media kept silent on Sami's case. Why?
Sami al-Hajj (Al-Jazeera), Sudan, Deborah Manning, (Alkarama for Human Rights), Switzerland/New Zealand and Benoît Hervieu, (Reporters Without Borders), France. Moderator: Håkon Haugsbø, (SKUP/NRK), Norway.
.  
 

Friday September 12th

09.00: How to find whistleblowers and get them to talk.
In 2003 Per-Yngve Monsen alerted superiors at Siemens Norway at first anonymously, to illegally excessively increased accounts. Instead of ensuring protection as promised in internal guidelines, Siemens management launched a witch hunt for identifying the leak. Monsen was unmasked and finally dismissed. In 2005 Siemens was held to have acted wrongly and required to pay damages by a Norwegian court. Lowell Bergman is a former producer at CBS 60 Minutes. He was played by Al Pacino in the Oscar-nominated movie "The Insider" (1999).
Per-Yngve Monsen, (Siemens whistleblower), Norway and Lowell Bergman, PBS Frontline, USA. Moderator: Renie Thorleifsson, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4+3.
09:00:  Shooting Women and Conflict in Manipur, India
Manipur, in a far-flung corner of India, has faced insurgency for half a century; and the brutal laws used by the Indian government to suppress it. Now the women of Manipur are using their bodies as their last weapon. “Tales from the Margins”, an award winning documentary, explores that issue and turns the spotlight on this conflict torn region.
Kavita Joshi (independent filmmaker), India. Moderator: Heidi Molstad Andresen, (Dagbladet), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
09:00: The 10 Best Web sites for investigative journalists
Paul Myers, BBC, UK.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
09:00: Mapping your news with Google Maps
Learn how you can map your local news and display them on the web with Google Maps.
Espen Andersen, (Norwegian Broadcasting Corp - NRK), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
09:00: Excel I: Creating your first spreadsheet, calculate and sort your data.
Helena Bengtsson (Swedish Television), Sweden and Trond Sundnes (Dagens Næringsliv).
Venue: Meeting room A2.
10.30: Break.
11.00: How to investigate corruption at international institutions
Hans-Martin Tillack had his files seized and was arrested by Belgian police for exposing wrongdoing at the EU statistics agency, Eurostat. Later he was cleared by the courts. Tillack, alongside with Stefano Valentino from Italy, will tell you how you can investigative corruption at international institutions.
Hans-Martin Tillack, (Stern), Germany and Stefano Valentino, (Euroreporter.eu), Italy .Moderator: Lars Nehru Sand, (Aftenposten), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
11:00: Tour de Steroids
After thirteen years of systematic research, two Danish reporters exposed steroid use in the world of cycling. How did they manage to locate documents and evidence? And how did they convince key witnesses to talk?
Niels Christian Jung, (Danmarks Radio), Denmark and Olav Skaaning Andersen (Danmarks Radio), Denmark. Moderator: Andrew Jennings (freelance), UK.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
11:00: Hidden camera in hostile environments
The panel will bring together two approaches on undercover investigations: a journalist and an expert. How do you get in and out safely? How do you shoot video w/o being caught? It will also discuss ethics and legislation related to the use of hidden camera.
Stefan Candea, ( Romanian Centre for Investigative Journalism), Romania and Allan Harraden, (Oztek Services), UK. Moderator: Morten Hansen, (freelance), Denmark.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
11:00: Investigative journalism in China: The power of Chinese bloggers
The power of the bloggers in China has been demonstrated many times to reveal state propaganda, and was again seen in the aftermath of the earthquake in May 2008. Isaac Mao is one of the pioneers of blogs in China. In 2005, he started the movement for adopting Chinese bloggers on overseas servers.
Isaac Mao, (independent blogger), China, Sun Yu, (Environmental Protection magazine), China, Yichao Wang, (Caijing Magazine), China and Hanne Marie Brevik (NRK), Norway. Moderator: Philip Lote, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
11:00: 72 women killed/The missing people of Cyprus
A team from Norway's largest daily investigated all murders in Norway since 2000 and found that 72 women were murdered by either their husband or ex-husband. The journalists put all their stories and most of the research material on a special Web page for the project. After withstanding years of silence, Cypriot families—both Greek and Turkish—are beginning to learn about the relatives they lost to political violence and to reclaim their remains. Sevgul Uludag has spurred that process of national healing with her stories. 
Anne Stine Sæther, (VG), Norway and Sevgul Uludag, (Yeniduzen/Politis), Cyprus.
Venue: Inga.
11:00: Advanced mapping: ArcView
With ArcView you can combine maps with different data layers.
Jennifer LaFleur, ProPublica, USA.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
11:00: Excel II: Downloading data into Excel, using simple formulas to format and
analyze you material.
Helena Bengtsson (Swedish Television), Sweden and Trond Sundnes (Dagens Næringsliv), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
11:00: EXTRA SESSION (TBA)
Venue: Meeting room B.
12:00: Lunch.
13.30: Investigating oil and gas I: The politics of Big Oil
As the scramble for oil and gas intensifies, how do we investigate the industry and the politics that surrounds it. Vivienne Walt of TIME Magazine gives you the overview, and Sarah Wykes from Global Witness tells about her experience in researching a culture of corruption in oil-rich Angola, which landed her in jail for spying. 
Vivienne Walt, (Time Magazine), France/USA and Sarah Wykes, Global Witness, UK. Moderator: William Marsden, Canada.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
13.30:  Global Investigative Journalism - Strategies for support
David Kaplan has looked at how different centers for investigative journalism work and have they are organized and financed. Mark Hunter is convinced we need a new business model for investigative journalism. He points out how the value of investigative reporting is shifting, for the public as well as for journalists, and what that means for our work. Best practices for surviving and thriving will be considered. So will the profound shift toward community-based information that is changing who does investigations, why, and for whom.  
David Kaplan, (International Consortium of Investigative Journalists), USA, Mark Hunter, (INSEAD), France and Brant Houston (University of Illinois), USA. Moderator: Henrik Kaufholz, (Politiken/Danish SCOOP), Denmark.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
13:30: Flip the coin: how the north exploits the south
A series of documentaries shows the backside of globalization. Reporters investigated large Scandinavian companies, which are using cheap labor and exploiting local resources, to keep the production costs low. The first program on working conditions for workers in Bangladesh in factories which deliver material to mobile phone companies Ericsson and Telenor, lead to public outrage.
Tom Heinemann, (Heinemann Medier), Denmark and Sonu Madhavan (freelance/fixer), India. Moderator: Morten Hansen (freelance), Denmark.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
13:30: What happened in China during the Olympics?
"Committing" journalism during the Beijing Olympics. Yao Xiaoling will present the findings of a brand new report on working conditions for foreign journalists during the Olympics. The report has been made in collaboration with the Norwegian Federation of Journalists and the Foreign Correspondents' Club of China.
Andrew Jennings (freelance), UK, Yao Xiaoling, (University of Oslo, Norway/China and Sami Sillanpaa, (Helsingin Sanomat), Finland. Moderator: Hanne Marie Brevik, (NRK Sport), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
13:30: Investigating mercury poisoning of dental workers
Women who worked as dental assistants in Norway were exposed to extremely high levels of mercury until 1990. Today they are known as the "mercury girls" and many of them are gravely ill.
Kjersti Knudssøn, (Norwegian Broadcasting Corp - NRK), Norway and Synnøve Bakke, (Norwegian Broadcasting Corp - NRK), Norway. Moderator: Maria Konow Lund, (Lillehammer University College), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
13:30: Scraping the web
By using OpenKapow, a free software program, you will learn how to download large databases published on the Internet, process the information on your own computer, and publish the material in a new and more advanced form.
Espen Andersen, (Norwegian Broadcasting Corp - NRK), Norway and Nils Mulvad, (Kaas & Mulvad), Denmark.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
13:30: Access I: Introduction to MS Access, for beginners. Learn how to sort and select
you material.
Helena Bengtsson, (Swedish Television), Sweden and Jennifer LaFleur, ProPublica, USA.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
13:30: Find links between people: Social Network Analysis
Find out who has the most powerful connections in a community. UCINET is a program designed to facilitate the analysis of social network data, and it is a tool for visualizing and diagramming relations. Basic skills in Excel are necessary. 
John Bones, (Verdens Gang), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room B.
14:30: Break
15:00: Investigating oil and gas II: Environmental and social impact in emerging oil countries
Nigerian Sam Olukoya is producing the documentary "The Naked Option", which reveals how local women in Nigeria's oil-rich Niger Delta use "stripping naked", a serious cultural taboo, to fight environmental and cultural ruin by the world's most powerful corporate giants. Olukoya and Sunday Dare talks about the environmental and social impact the oil-industry has had in Nigeria. Does Big Oil leave their standards at home when they scramble for Africa’s black gold?
Sam Olukoya, (BBC/IPS), Nigeria and Sunday Dare, (Nieman Fellow at Harvard), USA/Nigeria. Moderator: William Marsden, Canada.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
15:00: Understanding Company Accounts: Financial and company filings and disclosures
Michael Gillard, (Sunday Times), UK and Raj Bairoliya, (FTI Forensic Accounting), UK.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
15:00: Investigating the nuclear threat
Since the early 1990's Igor Kudrik and Aleksander Nikitin have gathered impressive and shocking information about the environmental threat from Russia's nuclear waste. The duo focuses on their methods to uncover material Russian authorities did not want the rest of the world to know. They point out the most serious nuclear waste problems in Russia today and in the near future. The panel will also give a broader picture of the world's many unsolved nuclear waste problems elsewhere. 
Igor Kudrik (Bellona Web), Norway/Russia, Aleksander Nikitin, (Bellona, St. Petersburg), Russia and Darryl D'Monte (International Federation of Environmental Journalists), India. Moderator: Jan Gunnar Furuly, (Aftenposten), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
15:00: Crimes and Corruption in sport
How to have more fun as an investigative reporter: Probing corruption at the International Olympic Committee (IOC), FIFA and the major international sports federations can be hilarious – and socially worthwhile. Tracing the links between politicians, the biggest global brands and the sleazy vote-buying, bribery scams, kickbacks and rackets that have taken over world sport.
Andrew Jennings, (freelance/BBC Panorama) UK, Vlad Lavrov (Kiev Post), Ukraine and Murali Krishnan, (Indo-Asian News Service), India. Moderator: Bo Brekke, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
15:00: Joint investigative projects I: Costa Rica/Finland
Journalists from Finland and Costa Rica cooperated to investigate an incredible scam to sell medical equipment to Costa Rica's hospitals for over 30 million Euros. Most of the equipment is gathering dust because Costa Rica's hospitals had no need for the stuff. But the local officials who landed the lucrative deal got plenty of commission, which was used to buy expensive houses and cars.
Giannina Segnini, (La Nación), Costa Rica and Minna Knus Galan, (YLE Spotlight), Finland. Moderator: Gøril Engesvik, (Trønder-Avisa), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
15:00: Track changes on the web
The web keeps growing and it’s more important than ever to monitor what’s going on. For a growing number of journalists RSS feeds are becoming an important tool. This session gives you an overview of how to use RSS – and you’ll learn how you with free tools can create your own RSS feed so you will be able to monitor a site that doesn’t offer it.
Tommy Kaas, (Mulvad & Kaas), Denmark
Venue: Meeting room A1.
15:00: Access II: Calculations and sums - learn more about analyzing databases and
tables in Access. Basic knowledge of Access needed.
Helena Bengtsson, (Swedish Television), Sweden and Jennifer LaFleur, ProPublica, USA.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
15:00: How to use Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) internationally
Brigitte Alfter (freelance), Denmark, Alexenia Dimitrova, (24 Hours), Bulgaria and David B. Smallman, (Wollmuth Maher & Deutsch LLP), USA. Moderator: David Smallman, USA.
Venue: Meeting room B.
16:00: Break
16:30: Rendition: Following the CIA ghost planes
Three reporters show their experiences, with three different angles and a broad selection of techniques, on investigating the CIA ghost planes on secret deportation missions today known as "Extraordinary rendition".
Fredrik Laurin, (Swedish Television), Sweden, Stephen Grey, (freelance), UK and Margot Williams, (New York Times), USA. Moderator: Håkon Haugsbø, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
16:30: Understanding Company Accounts: How to read them and make sense of them
Michael Gillard, (Sunday Times), UK and Raj Bairoliya, (FTI Forensic Accounting), UK.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
16:30: Fatal words: The high cost of freedom of speech - fatwa against journalist
The reporting of young Nigerian journalist Isioma Daniel during the Miss World contest in Nigeria 2002 turned into a fatal combination of beauty queens, bloodshed, fear and fatwa. Isioma Daniel is today a refugee in Norway, working as a journalist for a regional newspaper.
Isioma Daniel, (Stavanger Aftenblad), Norway/Nigeria and Cecilie Rego, (Norwegian Broadcasting Corp – NRK), Norway. Moderator: Christine Præsttun, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
16:30: American Imports, Chinese Deaths
Reporter Loretta Tofani gets inside the largest factory in the U.S., China, where the lack of health and safety precautions has Chinese workers dying. Tofani spent 15 months in China doing the investigation that has given her a series of awards. Here she will tell how she broke the stories.
Loretta Tofani, (Salt Lake Tribune), USA. Moderator: David Kaplan, (ICIJ), USA.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
16:30: How to find the fast growing companies
During the years Trends Magazine has assembled a unique form of data, which provides input for a wide variety of analyses, enabling Trends to come up regularly with interesting rankings.
Lieven Desmet, (Trends Magazine), Belgium. Moderator: Josephine Freje Simonsson, (SVT), Sweden.
Venue: Inga.
16:30: EXTRA CAR-SESSION
Venue: Meeting room A1.
16:30: Extra CAR-session - EXCEL/ACCESS if needed
Venue: Meeting room A2.
16:30: Demo Retriever/Lexis Nexis
Learn how to use Lexis Nexis. Demo room available with full user access to all Lexis Nexis databases.
Venue: Meeting room B.
17.30: Break
18.00: Dinner
19:00: Speed Networking. Book your Speed Networking room by sending an e-mail to [email protected]
20:00: Screening: "Breaking the walls of silence"
The Norwegian-run radio station "Voice of Tibet" has become a serious thorn in China's side. Despite Beijing's best efforts, this media outlet, operating from Northern India, provides information to Tibetans that is otherwise denied them by the Chinese government. Producer Øystein Rakkenes will introduce the film. He will also be available for Q&A after the screening.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
21:00: Jam session. Baglern Pub.
 
 

Saturday September 13th

09:00: The Middle East: An exercise in lethal journalism
Robert Fisk (The Independent), UK, examines the failure of reporters to confront the realities of the Middle East, and asks why this great human tragedy is reported as if it was a football match. Moderator: Bibiana Dahle Piene, (GIJC-2008), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4+3.
09:00: How to use U.S. archives
Digging in U.S. archives can be digging for gold. What are the sources and how do you get access?
Frode Nielsen, Norwegian Broadcasting Corp (NRK), Norway and Margot Williams, (New York Times), USA. Moderator: Brant Houston, (University of Illinois), USA.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
09:00: Undercover Research: How do you hide your traces during online research?
Paul Myers (BBC), UK.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
09:00: Access I: Introduction to MS Access, for beginners. Learn how to sort and select
you material.
Helena Bengtsson, (Swedish Television), Sweden and Jennifer LaFleur, ProPublica, USA.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
10.30: Break
11:00: How to fund your project - entering new areas
Investigative journalism is making inroads in Arab countries in the Middle East and young, independent nations in transition in Eastern Europe. How can journalists in these areas get funding for their own projects? And where can they get training to be better investigative reporters? Also: Where do all the Investigative Journalism Centre’s get their money?
Ides Debruyne, (Pascal Decroos Fund for Investigative Journalism), Belgium, Rana Sabbagh, (Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism), Jordan, Mahasen al-Emam, (Arab Woman Media Centre), Jordan and Drew Sullivan (Center for Investigative Reporting), Bosnia. Moderator: Henrik Kaufholz, (Politiken/Danish SCOOP), Denmark.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
11:00: The dangerous life of a fixer
Sonu Madhavan from India was seriously beaten up when he approached a clothing factory in India with a camera in his hand. He is among the many local journalists doing “dirty work” for international media. Nils Hansson from Swedish Television ordered the footage in an investigation on working conditions. How can you better protect those working for you on the ground?
Sonu Madhavan (freelance/fixer), India, Nils Hansson (Swedish Television), Sweden, Rodney Pinder, (International News Safety Institute), Belgium and David Ritsher, PBS Frontline/World, USA. Moderator: Morten Hansen, (freelance), Denmark.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
11:00: How to present your in-depth investigation on TV
 
Sven Bergman (Swedish Television), Sweden and Joachim Dyfvermark, (Swedish Television), Sweden. Moderator: Margo Smit, (VVOJ), The Netherlands.
 
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
 
11:00: SS United States and the asbestos traces in Sevastopol
In the 1990's the famous liner SS United States was docked in Sevastopol in Ukraine for removal of asbestos. Years later it was discovered that the asbestos was stored in open warehouses and that the workers used it for construction of their datchas. She published her report, and after that Danish SCOOP funded a follow-up in the U.S., where SS United States is supposed to end as a museum. Irene Jay Liu from Center for Investigative Reporting found more dangerous substances aboard. The two reporters will present their findings and working methods. They do not understand each other’s language and this session will be done through simultaneous translation Russian-English
Tatjana Byts Rikhtun, (Sevastopolskya Gazeta), Ukraine and Irene Jay Liu, (Center for Investigative Reporting), USA.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
11:00: Documentary: USA vs. Al-Arian
In February 2003, university professor and Palestinian activist Sami Al-Arian was arrested in Tampa, Florida, charged with providing material support to a terrorist organization. While the Bush administration considered this a landmark case in its campaign against international terrorism, Sami Al-Arian claims he was targeted in an attempt to silence his political views. Director Line Halvorsen will discuss the making of the film, how she got such unique access to the family and analyze the media's role in covering this case.
 
Line Halvorsen, (independent film maker), Norway. Moderator: Maria Konow Lund, (Lillehammer University College), Norway.
 
Venue: Inga.
 
11:00: Online Bloodhound
The Online Bloodhound is a special course developed by journalists at the Norwegian Institute of Journalism on online research skills. The seminar teaches you about how the search engines ‘think’ and how to find information beyond Google. A 3-hour seminar has been developed for this conference, but close to 2000 Norwegian journalists have taken this seminar which normally lasts for two days. (Double session with continuation after the break!).
Andre Verløy, (Norwegian Institute of Journalism), Norway and Ståle de Lange Kofoed, (Norwegian Institute for Journalism), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
11:00: Access II: Calculations and sums - learn more about analyzing databases and
tables in Access. Basic knowledge of Access needed.
Helena Bengtsson, (Swedish Television), Sweden and Jennifer LaFleur, ProPublica, USA.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
11:00: Baby deaths: A hospital investigation
South African newspaper Daily Dispatch ran a series of stories about the high rate of babies dying in the maternity unit of the city's local state hospital, Frere. The stories went on to win two national awards this year for exposing the negligence behind many of the infant deaths at the hospital.
Brett Horner (Daily Dispatch) South Africa. Moderator: Grete Holstad, (Adresseavisen), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room B.
12:00: Lunch
13.30: The Jewel of Medina - what can you publish about the prophet Muhammed?
New controversy on what you can write and publish about the prophet Muhammed: In May Random House decided to stop American journalist Sherry Jones' historical novel "The Jewel of Medina" about the prophet Muhammed's relationship with his young favourite wife Aisha. The book was dubbed "soft core porn" by an American expert on Islam. In October it is published with new publishers in Europe and U.S.
Sherry Jones (freelance), USA and Asra Q. Nomani (Georgetown University), USA. Moderator: Ingeborg Eliassen, (Stavanger Aftenblad), Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
13:30: Investigating oil and gas III: Oil exploration in rough places
What happens when foreign oil companies enter areas with inexperienced governments, such as Iraqi Kurdistan, East Timor and Papua New Guinea? The politicians hire foreign consultants with intimate knowledge of the oil and gas trade or the United Nations sends them to new oil democracies. These consultants go much further than writing the oil and gas contracts, they write the petroleum laws, they write the fiscal policy, they advise on relations with other countries or central government - usually completely outside the control of parliament and without talking to interest groups in society.
Anna Zayer van Ammelroy, (freelance) Iraq, Trond Sundnes, (Dagens Næringsliv), Norway and Vivienne Walt, (Time Magazine), France/USA. Moderator: Morten Hansen, (freelance), Denmark.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
13:30: Caucasus burning
Television reporter Tamara Urushadze was reporting live for Georgia’s state television from Gori during the fighting between Russia and Georgia when she was shot in the arm. After treatment in an ambulance and with a bandage she came back, lifted the microphone, and continued her job. Is the short war between Georgia and Russia the start of a "new cold war"? What are the future scenaries for Caucasus?
Simultaneous translation Russian-English.
Tamara Urushadze, Public television, Georgia and Jakub M. Godzimirski, (Norwegian Institute for International Affairs), Norway/Poland. Moderator: Siri Lill Mannes, (TV 2), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
13:30: Female circumcision in Europe
German journalist Valentin Thurn and Norwegian journalist Tormod Strand has done impressive work on female circumcision among immigrants in Europe, a hugely controversial topic. Girls are being sent back to their native countries; sources and reporters are being threatened. How did the reporters get their story? And was it difficult for two men to work on such a controversial subject and to get sources among female Muslims?
Tormod Strand, (Norwegian Broadcasting Corp - NRK), Norway and Valentin Thurn, (Thurnfilm), Germany. Moderator: Heidi Molstad Andresen, (Dagbladet), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
13:30: Online Bloodhound – continued from 11am
The Online Bloodhound is a special course developed by journalists at the Norwegian Institute of Journalism on online research skills. The seminar teaches you about how the search engines ‘think’ and how to find information beyond Google. A 3-hour seminar has been developed for this conference, but close to 2000 Norwegian journalists have taken this seminar which normally lasts for two days.
Andre Verløy, (Norwegian Institute of Journalism), Norway and Ståle de Lange Kofoed, (Norwegian Institute for Journalism), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
13:30: Excel III: Advanced formulas, conditions and parsing text.
Helena Bengtsson (Swedish Television), Sweden and Trond Sundnes (Dagens Næringsliv), Norway.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
13:30: How to encrypt your hard disk and e-mail
Do you want to make your e-mail communication and your computer files secure? Step by step on how to use encryption tool Pretty Good Privacy. (Double session with continuation after the break).
Fredrik Laurin, (SVT), Sweden.
Venue: Meeting room B.
14:30: Break
15:00: Investigating the war criminals
Two Pulitzer-winners share experiences from their war crime investigations: In 2005 Matthew McAllester heard that a Serbian war criminal he had been following since the war in Kosovo had been arrested in Argentina. McAllester, then a correspondent for Newsday, New York, turned his attention on other former Yugoslav war crimes suspects living in the United States who had been arrested by federal agents on immigration charges. Two of the men he spent months investigating are now on trial at the War Crimes Chamber in Bosnia, charged with participating in the Srebrenica massacre. Deborah Nelson has another approach: Digging deep into declassified documents from the Vietnam war she investigated an extraordinary archive: the largest compilation of records on Vietnam-era war crimes ever to surface.
Matthew McAllester, (Details magazine), UK and Deborah Nelson, (DART), USA. Moderator: Susanne Reber, (CBC), Canada.
Venue: Weidemann 3.
15:00: When farmers die
Why have 166 000 Indian farmers committed suicide in ten years? And why have the media failed to report their distress?
P. Sainath, (The Hindu), India. Moderator: Maria Konow Lund, (Lillehammer University College), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
15:00: Covering the secret services and terrorism issues in Russia
How do you cover intelligence agencies with increased restrictions by the authorities? Since 2000 a group of Russian journalists have ran project Agentura.Ru, a Web site on secret services and terrorism issues.
Andrei Soldatov (Novaya Gazeta/Agentura.ru/ and Irina Borogan, (Novaya Gazeta/Agentura.ru), Russia. Moderator: Siri Lill Mannes, (TV 2), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
15:00: Warrior’s in exile: Democratic Voice of Burma
From a small studio in Oslo, Norway, Democratic Voice of Burma is spreading news from one of the most closed countries in the world. How do they get their sources and stories?
Khin Maung Win, (Democratic Voice of Burma), Burma/Norway. Moderator: Christine Præsttun, (NRK), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
15:00: ArcView
With ArcView you can combine maps with different data layers. The name of this advanced kind of mapping is Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
Jennifer LaFleur, ProPublica, USA.
Venue: Meeting room A1.
15:00: Access III: Joining databases - how to find connections between tables.
Helena Bengtsson, (Swedish Television), Sweden and Tommy Kaas, (Kaas & Mulvad), Denmark.
Venue: Meeting room A2.
15:00: How to encrypt your hard disk and e-mail (continuation from 13:30)
Do you want to make your e-mail communication and your computer files secure? Step by step on how to use encryption tool Pretty Good Privacy.
Fredrik Laurin, (Swedish Television), Sweden.
Venue: Meeting room B.
16:00: Break
16:30: GIJ Network meeting: Where will GIJC be in 2010; other issues facing the network.
16:30: Speed Networking.
19:00: Banquet with international investigative journalism prizes: The Global Shining Light Award and Daniel Pearl Award.
Music: World music star Mari Boine and Valkyrien Allstars.
Hosted by Håkon Haugsbø, SKUP, Norway.
22:30: Club concert with Valkyrien Allstars + DJ dance show.
 
 

Sunday September 14th

10.00: Killed on duty
On January 14 of this year Norwegian journalist Carsten Thomassen was shot and killed by terrorists at Hotel Serena in Kabul. Two of the most experienced war correspondents in Norway was directly involved in the attempt to save his life. Harald Henden, photojournalist in VG, the largest paper in Norway, and Fredrik Græsvik, foreign correspondent in TV2, give their story of what happened at Hotel Serena and afterwards.
Fredrik Græsvik, (TV 2), Norway and Harald Henden (Verdens Gang), Norway. Moderator: Siri Lill Mannes, TV 2, Norway.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
10:00: How to get people to talk
What can you do to get that crucial source to spill their story? Learn how to use your surroundings, research and small-talk to prepare you to delve into the human emotions of fear, curiosity, pride, civic duty and sense of justice - all for the noble cause of getting at the truth, and getting people to tell you stories they are reluctant to tell.
John Nicol, (CBC), Canada. Moderator: Bent Botten, (Tidens Krav), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.

10:00: Amazon in danger: Journalist under legal intimidation battle.

For more than 40 years Brazilian Lúcio Flávio Pinto in Belem has been covering the destruction of Amazonas. This has given him a long list of enemies, and Pinto has been at the receiving end of curses, beatings and death threats for his investigations. He's been sued 33 times, and the continuing legal intimidation battle hinders him for travelling out of Brazil. Since he could not come to Lillehammer we sent freelance photo reporter Carlos Caju da Silva to the Amazon to interview Pinto on tape.  
Lúcio Flávio Pinto (Jornal Pessoal), Brazil and Carlos Caju da Silva, (freelance), Brazil.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
10:00: Democracy in danger: Berlusconi and the silence of the media
The first step by Berlusconi when he won the April elections was to grant himself immunity from two already on-going trials where he was charged with corruption. The new law, which protects the prime minister, the president and several other political positions was approved by parliament. What will be the second step? To gag journalists and provide severe sentences for those who will write articles on every investigations.
Leo Sisti, (L'Espresso), Italy.
Moderator: Marianne Ruud, (Utdanning), Norway.
Venue: Inga.
11:00: Break
11:30: The loss of a colleague: How does the human mind cope with stress reactions?
How does the human mind react when a colleague is wounded, and you are the one next to her? How do we deal with stress reactions after a traumatic experience, be it imprisonment or a shooting incident? Psychiatrist Lars Weisæth has been directly involved as therapist and researcher in crises, catastrophes and wars for four decades.
Lars Weisæth, (Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies), Norway. Moderator: Gavin Rees, (Dart Centre Europe), UK.
Venue: Weidemann 5+4.
11:30: Joint investigative projects III: Norway/South-Africa – The Waterworks scandal and the South African game farm
A team of reporters from Aftenposten was honored in Norway in 2005 for their investigation of corruption. A former director of a municipality-owned waterworks facility had together with his son and several contractors embezzled millions of Norwegian kroner. The money trail led them to South Africa and with assistance from a South African reporter, the reporters ended up at a game farm, with zebras and giraffes, bought for Norwegian tax payers money.
Anne Hafstad, (Aftenposten), Norway, Siri Gedde-Dahl, (Aftenposten), Norway, Alf Endre Magnussen, (Aftenposten), Norway and Louise Flanagan, (The Star), South Africa. Moderator: Lars Nehru Sand, (Aftenposten), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 1.
11:30: Investigative journalism with a camera
Meet an award-winning photographer from Bangladesh who had to flee his country for a period of time. He focuses his lenses on the poor and most stigmatized in his region. His photos of child workers, prostitutes and hermaphrodites have won world wide acclamation, but no fans at home. 
G.M.B Akash, (freelance photographer), Bangladesh. Moderator: Gøril Engesvik, (Trønder-Avisa), Norway.
Venue: Birkebeiner 2.
11:30: Investigating natural disasters
Why do some natural disasters grab the media spotlight while others languish in the shadows? How can journalists get beneath the skin of difficult-to-cover crises? How can they connect the dots between climate change, natural disasters and human suffering? How can they hold the multi-billion dollar aid industry up to scrutiny?
Timothy Large, (Reuters AlertNet), UK.  
Venue: Inga.
12:30: Lunch
13:30: Bye, bye!